Comparison of physical performance and health related quality of life in Chinese women from an osteoporosis clinic and the community

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Comparison of physical performance and health related quality of life in Chinese women from an osteoporosis clinic and the community

 

Author: Mok, Wai-wah Quiteria
Title: Comparison of physical performance and health related quality of life in Chinese women from an osteoporosis clinic and the community
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 1999
Subject: Osteoporosis in women -- China -- Hong Kong
Osteoporosis -- China -- Hong Kong
Older women -- Health and hygiene -- China -- Hong Kong
Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Department: Multi-disciplinary Studies
Dept. of Rehabilitation Sciences
Pages: xii, 89 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm
Language: English
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b1479345
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/2309
Abstract: Osteoporosis is a major health problem in Hong Kong with an estimated 30% of post-menopausal women affected (Pun et al 1991). Quantitatively, osteoporosis is defined as a bone mineral density (BMD) reading which is > 2.5 standard deviations below the mean of the young-normal population (WHO 1994). The goal of this study was to initiate baseline measures in physiotherapy for clients of the Osteoporosis Clinic, Ruttonjee Hospital. The objectives were: 1) to determine if the bone mineral density of the calcaneus matched with the level of muscle strength of the attached plantar flexor muscles and 2) to determine if women from the Osteoporosis Clinic represent a unique group in need of physiotherapy services as compared to other community-dwelling elderly women. Methods: Using age, grip strength and the BMD of the calcaneus (Clinical Bone Sonometer), 75 community-dwelling women (mean age = 69.5+-6.9) were classified into 3 groups- "Osteoporosis" (BMD <= -2.5), "At Risk" (BMD between -1.0 & -2.5) or "Community/Control" (BMD >= -1.0). Additional measures of physical performance included: grip strength, gait speed (usual pace), isometric strength of plantar flexor muscles, and the Berg Balance Scale. Health-related quality of life was also evaluated by using the Hong Kong Chinese version of the SF-36. Results/Discussion: Decreased isometric strength of the plantar flexor muscles correlated with the decreased BMD of the calcaneus (r=0.57, p=0.000). In comparison to the Community/Control Group, women in the At Risk and Osteoporosis Groups showed, on average, decreased plantar flexor muscle strength (p=0.000), a slower gait speed (p=0.000), and poorer balance performance (p=0.000). Mean scores on the Berg Balance Scale differed between the three groups. Within the Osteoporosis Group, 68% were identified as potential "community-dwelling fallers" (i.e. score <= 49 out of 56; Shumway-Cook et at 1997), in contrast to 32% of the At Risk Group. The three groups differed in the perception of health-related quality of life. Conclusion: Using three groups of women of similar age and activity levels but with different levels of bone mass, a parallel relationship (that was decreased for women with osteoporosis) was found between the BMD of the calcaneus and the isometric muscle strength of the attached plantar flexors. Women in the At Risk and Osteoporosis Groups differed from the Control Group in physical performance. The physical problems identified are known to response to common physiotherapy interventions. Differences between the three groups in the perception of health-related quality of life suggest that women at risk for osteoporosis may be in need of greater psychosocial support.

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