Withdrawal cognitions of employee turnover : an investigation of its predictors and moderators

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Withdrawal cognitions of employee turnover : an investigation of its predictors and moderators

 

Author: Chan, Mei-ying, Sheron
Title: Withdrawal cognitions of employee turnover : an investigation of its predictors and moderators
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 1996
Subject: Labor turnover -- China -- Hong Kong
Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Department: Multi-disciplinary Studies
Pages: vii, 77 leaves : ill. ; 31 cm
Language: English
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b1224931
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/2391
Abstract: Employee turnover is a popular personnel research topic in other countries and thousands of studies have been done. Despite Hong Kong's high turnover rate (about 22% in 1993/1994: Institute of Human Resources Management), little research has been done in Hong Kong. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the factors and moderators contributing to turnover in Hong Kong. On the basis of two major theories of turnover (Mobley, 1978 and Hom and Griffeth, 1994), an integrative model of turnover was developed and seven hypotheses were tested. 'Withdrawal cognitions' was used as the dependent variable as it has been found to be the immediate predictor of employee turnover. Job satisfaction, organizational commitment and job involvement were hypothesized as three unique predictors of withdrawal cognitions. Job involvement was also assumed to interact with job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Uncertainty (individual, company and Hong Kong) was assumed to be moderator of the relationship between job involvement, job satisfaction and organizational commitment and withdrawal cognitions. Moreover, the antecedents of job satisfaction, job involvement and organizational commitment included various personal factors, organizational factors and work-related factors. A survey was held in Swire Bottlers Limited and a total of 222 questionnaires were used for data analysis. From the regression results, co-worker satisfaction, affective and normative commitment were found to be significant predictors of withdrawal cognitions. Job involvement did not have a direct association with withdrawal cognitions but moderated security satisfaction and affective commitment. Those employees with low security satisfaction had higher withdrawal cognitions if they had high job involvement. Those employees with low affective commitment had higher withdrawal cognitions if they had low job involvement. In addition, uncertainty was a significant moderator of the relationships between withdrawal cognitions and both job involvement and supervisory satisfaction. Those employees with low job involvement had higher withdrawal cognitions if they had low uncertainty about their individual residency in Hong Kong. Employees with low supervisory satisfaction had higher withdrawal cognitions if their perceived uncertainty of the company was high. As for employees with high job involvement, they had higher withdrawal cognitions if they felt highly uncertain about Hong Kong's future. For the antecedents of job involvement, job satisfaction and organizational commitment, personal factors were not very significant. For job satisfaction, only satisfaction with human resources policies was found to be a unique predictor of pay satisfaction, co-worker satisfaction, growth satisfaction, security satisfaction and supervisory satisfaction. Number of dependents, job overload, performance and human resources policies were found to be significant factors affecting job involvement. For organizational commitment, the common antecedent of affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment was role clarity. Finally, limitations and recommendations were discussed as a conclusion of this paper.

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