The discriminative power of the wolf motor function test in assessing different levels of upper extremity functions in stroke clients

Pao Yue-kong Library Electronic Theses Database

The discriminative power of the wolf motor function test in assessing different levels of upper extremity functions in stroke clients

 

Author: Ang, Hui-yong Josephine
Title: The discriminative power of the wolf motor function test in assessing different levels of upper extremity functions in stroke clients
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 2005
Subject: Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Arm -- Movements
Function tests (Medicine)
Cerebrovascular disease -- Patients
Motor ability -- Testing
Department: Dept. of Rehabilitation Sciences
Pages: ix, 60 leaves ; 30 cm
Language: English
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b1818204
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/5085
Abstract: An ideal upper extremity motor function assessment for individuals with stroke would be one that is capable to differentiate motor functions between those with severe motor deficit and near normal motor function and its results can be generalizable or predictive in real-life situation. The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) has been a new time-based method to evaluate the upper extremity function on joint-specific level and also on total limb movements while performing some functional tasks. The study attempted to investigate the discriminating power of the Wolf Motor Function Test in classifying individuals with stroke into different levels according to the Brunnstrom's stages of recovery. Discriminant analysis was used and the results showed that the Wolf Motor Function Test was able to classify 86.7% of original grouped cases into correct grouping. Besides, the correlation between the Wolf Motor Function Test and other upper extremity function assessments such as the Brunnstom's stages of recovery and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment was high. The correlation with the functional Modified Barthel Index was a little bit lower although the result was still statistically significant. Age and affected sidedness of an individual were also related to the assessments used. As a conclusion, the study demonstrated initial evidence that the Wolf Motor Function was able to discriminate the upper extremity motor function of the individuals with stroke into different functional groups. Further study could be carried out to study the cut-off points for each group as defined by upper limb functions.

Files in this item

Files Size Format
b18182045.pdf 2.277Mb PDF
Copyright Undertaking
As a bona fide Library user, I declare that:
  1. I will abide by the rules and legal ordinances governing copyright regarding the use of the Database.
  2. I will use the Database for the purpose of my research or private study only and not for circulation or further reproduction or any other purpose.
  3. I agree to indemnify and hold the University harmless from and against any loss, damage, cost, liability or expenses arising from copyright infringement or unauthorized usage.
By downloading any item(s) listed above, you acknowledge that you have read and understood the copyright undertaking as stated above, and agree to be bound by all of its terms.

     

Quick Search

Browse

More Information