A descriptive study of factors affecting the acceptance on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among university students in Hong Kong

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A descriptive study of factors affecting the acceptance on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among university students in Hong Kong

 

Author: Leung, Yee-chi Ada
Title: A descriptive study of factors affecting the acceptance on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among university students in Hong Kong
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 2010
Subject: Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Cervix uteri -- Cancer -- China -- Hong Kong -- Prevention
Women college students -- Health and hygiene -- China -- Hong Kong
Papillomavirus vaccines
Department: Faculty of Health and Social Sciences
Pages: xi, 132 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b2356828
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/5680
Abstract: Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the commonest sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) worldwide. Clinical studies have confirmed that HPV infection is the major cause cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is the fifth most common form of cancer in Hong Kong. The HPV vaccination has been made available since 2007. It is a prophylactic vaccine developed to prevent about 70%-90% of cervical cancer by preventing infection by two high-risk types of HPV, types 16 and 18. The most appropriate target group for the HPV vaccination is young females before they become sexually active. To promote this newly developed vaccine, it is essential to understand what factors cause females to receive the HPV vaccine. Aim of the study: To determine the factors influencing the acceptance of the HPV vaccination among female university students in Hong Kong. Method: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of female university students. Included were questions, on the respondents' socio-demographic characteristics, sexual and gynecologic history, knowledge about HPV, and health beliefs about HPV vaccination adopted from the Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS). Students who agreed to participate the study by giving their verbal consent were handed a 67-item self-administered questionnaire. Results: A total of 432 university students were recruited for the study. Only 12.1% of them had received the HPV vaccination, while around 50% intended to get vaccinated for HPV. The knowledge level of the university students was generally low, with a mean knowledge score of 6.0 (SD = 2.89). Most of the demographic variables and sexual experiences of the respondents were not significantly associated with vaccination status and the intention to receive the HPV vaccine. An independent t-test showed that perceived severity of an HPV infection, and the perceived benefits, barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy of HPV vaccines were significantly associated with vaccination status and the intention to receive the HPV vaccine. The result of the logistic regression indicated that the perceived severity and self-efficacy of the HPV vaccine, and the benefits and barriers to receiving the HPV vaccine, as well the number of sexual partners in lifetime, were significant positive predictors of the likelihood of receiving the HPV vaccine among the female university students, while the perceived barriers towards the intention to receive the HPV vaccine was a significant negative predictor. Conclusion: In the future, programmes to promote HPV vaccinations should emphasize the benefits and effectiveness of the vaccine as well as minimize the barriers to getting vaccinated. Nurses and other medical professionals should develop strategies to increase the acceptance of the vaccination, and motivate females to go and get vaccinated. In this way, more females would boost their immunity and improve their health. Further studies involving random samples from different age groups and community backgrounds should be conducted.

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