Correlation of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV DNA levels in chronic hepatitis B patient

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Correlation of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV DNA levels in chronic hepatitis B patient

 

Author: Mak, Siu-san
Title: Correlation of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV DNA levels in chronic hepatitis B patient
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 2011
Subject: Hepatitis B virus -- Genetic aspects.
Hepatitis B.
Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Department: Dept. of Health Technology and Informatics
Pages: 71 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b2458030
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/6233
Abstract: Chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer is mainly caused by hepatitis B virus. Chronic hepatitis B is a medical condition of liver disease caused by necrotizing inflammation of continuously infection of hepatitis B virus. By estimated calculation, around the world, there were nearly three hundred and fifty million people infected HBV chronically and cause about one million deaths each year. Based on the AASLD practice guidelines, a preliminary assessment of people who is first time diagnosed with chronic HBV infection should include review disease history, body check with appropriate blood tests. Initially did not consider the patient's treatment, they should be follow up in three to six month period. HBV replication in the body becomes the major signal of chronic HBV infection. HBV DNA titers in serum are the 'gold standard' in the evaluation of HBV replication, but this is too expensive, too complicated as a routine test. HBsAg provides a sensitive and specific marker of HBV infection. This study is to verify whether the ARCHITECT Quantitative HBsAg Assay could be used as a marker for viral replication in chronic hepatitis B patient, and elucidate the correlation significance of quantitative HBsAg level to HBV DNA level and also the ALT level to HBV DNA level according to the HBeAg seroconversion status. In this study, chronic hepatitis B patient with HBsAg positive more than six months was chosen between Sept.2009 to Sept. 2010 in St. Teresa's Hospital. Patient serum HBV DNA level greater than 20000 IU/mL or less than 20000 IU/mL was chosen. About 80 patients with known HBV DNA level were chosen. Patients were classified into four groups as follow according to HBV DNA level and HBeAg status. Group I: HBV DNA <20000 IU/mL and Negative in HBeAg, Group II: HBV DNA <20000 IU/mL and Positive in HBeAg, Group III: HBV DNA >or= 20000 IU/mL and Negative in HBeAg, Group IV: HBV DNA >or= 20000 IU/mL and Positive in HBeAg. The overall correlation between serum quantitative HBsAg level and HBV DNA was significant (r=0.3958, p=0.0003). But when we divided the patient into four subgroups, the results shows that the correlation between quantitative HBsAg and HBV DNA were more significant in HBeAg positive patient with high level of serum HBV DNA level (group 4 patients, r=0.6202, p=0.0136). And the correlation is a linear relationship. (r²=0.7535, p<0.0001). The overall correlation between HBV DNA level and ALT level for all patients was significant (r=0.4310, p&lt;0.0001) by the spearman correlation test. When we divided the patients into 4 subgroups according to the HBV DNA level and HBeAg status, we found that the HBV DNA level and ALT level of each subgroup shows non-significant correlation. In conclusion, the overall correlation between quantitative HBsAg and HBV DNA was significant. Also, the overall correlation between ALT level and HBV DNA was significant. When the subgroups were split according to different HBV DNA level and HBeAg status, the results were reverse. Quantitative HBsAg appears to better reflect HBV DNA level in patients with high HBV DNA level and HBeAg positive status.

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