Effect of long-term habitual exercise on sirtuins expression and activity in rat skeletal muscle

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Effect of long-term habitual exercise on sirtuins expression and activity in rat skeletal muscle

 

Author: Chong, Tat Ki Jack
Title: Effect of long-term habitual exercise on sirtuins expression and activity in rat skeletal muscle
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 2014
Subject: Skeletal maturity.
Musculoskeletal system.
Rats -- Physiology
Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Department: Dept. of Health Technology and Informatics
Pages: ix, 54 leaves : illustraions (some color) ; 30 cm
Language: English
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b2761968
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/7806
Abstract: Skeletal muscles comprise a large proportion of total body mass. There is growing evidence that changes of muscle metabolism influence health status. Regular exercise brings health benefits. These benefits are believed to come from exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaption. Sirtuin 1(Sirt1) and sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) control muscle metabolism and hence believed to be the key regulator of exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaption. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of long-term habitual exercise on total sirtuin activity and expression of Sirt1 and Sirt3 in rat skeletal muscle. We hypothesize that long-term habitual exercise is able to increase the total sirtuin activity and expression of Sirt1 and Sirt3 in rat skeletal muscle. Sixteen young female Sprague -Dawley rats were randomly assigned to exercise and control group. After 20 weeks of voluntary wheel running experiment, mRNA, protein expression and activity of Sirt1 & Sirt3 in plantaris muscles were measured. There was no significant difference in mRNA and protein expression between exercise and control group, but total sirtuin activity was ~29% higher in the exercise group than in the control group. These findings indicate that 20 weeks of habitual exercise are capable of increasing sirtuin activity within skeletal muscle, and this increase is probably modulated by post translational modification.

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