The influence of organizational commitment and occupational commitment on work behaviors : a study of executive officers employed in UGC-funded tertiary institutions in Hong Kong

Pao Yue-kong Library Electronic Theses Database

The influence of organizational commitment and occupational commitment on work behaviors : a study of executive officers employed in UGC-funded tertiary institutions in Hong Kong

 

Author: Cheung, Yuk-sim
Title: The influence of organizational commitment and occupational commitment on work behaviors : a study of executive officers employed in UGC-funded tertiary institutions in Hong Kong
Degree: M.Sc.
Year: 1997
Subject: College personnel management -- China -- Hong Kong
College administrators -- China -- Hong Kong
Organizational behavior
Job satisfaction
Commitment (Psychology)
Hong Kong Polytechnic University -- Dissertations
Department: Multi-disciplinary Studies
Pages: vii, 76, [11] ; 30 cm
Language: English
InnoPac Record: http://library.polyu.edu.hk/record=b1403618
URI: http://theses.lib.polyu.edu.hk/handle/200/860
Abstract: It has often been said that the progress of an organization depends upon the staff's working attitude and performance. The organization prospers if the level of commitment and satisfaction of staff is high and they are willing to perform roles of benefit to the organization. As higher education in Hong Kong is a matter of public concern, the work attitude and behaviors of employees in tertiary institutions should deserve our attention. With the government's decision to accelerate the expansion of tertiary education in 1989 which led to a rapid growth of the tertiary places, and the passing of the Occupational Retirement Scheme Ordinance in 1992 which brought amendments to the Superannuation Schemes for university staff, this study attempted to investigate the impact of the two events on the work attitudes and behaviors of university staff with a focus on the Executive Officers. On the other hand, although there have been extensive research on employees' job satisfaction, organizational commitment, occupational commitment, turnover intention and organizational citizenship behaviors, little research have been conducted to investigate the inter-relationships of these variables. This study proposed a model to capture the inter-correlation between these variables of work attitudes and behaviors. A quantitative survey was developed to test the proposed model, using university Executive Officers as a sample for the survey. The results indicated that the government's policy on expanding higher education has brought to university Executive Officers with lower affective occupational commitment and higher continuance occupational commitment. The changeover of the superannuation schemes, however, has no significant impact on their turnover intention. The results of the study also revealed that occupational turnover intention is significantly predicted by the combination of job satisfaction and occupational commitment, while organizational turnover intention is significantly predicted by the combination of job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Organizational citizenship behavior is significantly predicted by occupational commitment. The affective commitment was found to be the most important component in such predictions. In addition, correlation among the variables was reviewed. The results were generally in agreement with previous research findings. Demographic variables like age, number of years of full-time working experience and frequency of promotion were found to be significantly correlated with the variables of job satisfaction, commitments and organizational citizenship behaviors, but they were not constructed to be a strong and consistent moderator for the variables of commitments and work behaviors. Besides, it was found that the university Executive Officers are more committed to their occupation than to their organization. Their occupational and organizational turnover intentions are not so strong, they have moderate job satisfaction and perform organizational citizenship behavior quite often.

Files in this item

Files Size Format
b14036186.pdf 3.396Mb PDF
Copyright Undertaking
As a bona fide Library user, I declare that:
  1. I will abide by the rules and legal ordinances governing copyright regarding the use of the Database.
  2. I will use the Database for the purpose of my research or private study only and not for circulation or further reproduction or any other purpose.
  3. I agree to indemnify and hold the University harmless from and against any loss, damage, cost, liability or expenses arising from copyright infringement or unauthorized usage.
By downloading any item(s) listed above, you acknowledge that you have read and understood the copyright undertaking as stated above, and agree to be bound by all of its terms.

     

Quick Search

Browse

More Information